Dyslexia centre founder convicted in Quebec of assessing disorder without licence

Share Button

A woman who operates a dyslexia centre in Ottawa has been convicted in Quebec of assessing mental disorders without the proper medical qualifications.

Louise Brazeau-Ward was found guilty on Thursday in a Gatineau court on charges of diagnosing mental disorders without a licence and fined $1,500.

The charges against Brazeau-Ward, who is neither a psychologist nor a physician, stem from a dyslexia diagnosis she made in April 2015 in Gatineau, Que.

Dyslexia can only be diagnosed in Quebec by a regulated medical professional, such as a psychologist, doctor, speech pathologist, or a counsellor or nurse with specific certification.

Screening versus diagnosing

Brazeau-Ward has declared herself self-taught at assessing dyslexia, and said she doesn’t agree the learning disability should be labelled a mental disorder.

She runs the Canadian Dyslexia Centre in Ottawa and had told CBC News her legal trouble occurred when she briefly opened an office in Gatineau.

Her lawyer, Pierre McMartin, had told Radio-Canada in April that what Brazeau-Ward does is screen to see if people have the characteristics of dyslexia, but said she doesn’t actually diagnose.

But the Quebec College of Psychologists, the governing body which brought forward the charges in January, disagreed.

A spokesperson for the college said on Friday the college was pleased with the decision.

See more here: 

Dyslexia centre founder convicted in Quebec of assessing disorder without licence

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *