Can discrimination contribute to feelings of radicalization?

Muslim immigrants who feel marginalized and discriminated against in countries that expect them to integrate into their culture and society are more likely to experience psychological threats to their own significance that could be related to increased support of radicalism, according to new research presented at the American Psychological Association’s 125th Annual Convention.

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Trans fat bans lessen health risks, research suggests

People living in areas that restrict trans fats in foods had fewer hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke compared to residents in areas without restrictions, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine and Yale School of Medicine.

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Driver privacy can be compromised in usage-based insurance systems

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have demonstrated that is possible to compromise a driver’s private information stored in the cloud for Usage-Based Insurance (UBI) programs based on only part of the data collected.

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College-student status does not automatically mean excessive drinking

College matriculation is often associated with increases in the frequency and intensity of drinking. This study used a national sample to examine the association between being a college student and changes in excessive drinking from late adolescence through young adulthood and whether students’ residing with their parents during the school year affected the association.

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Super bowl won’t make you feel super, even if your team wins

With last year’s Super Bowl drawing in over 114 million viewers, you’d assume that much of the audience tuned in not just for the commercials, but for the enjoyment of the game. You’d be wrong, say communication researchers Drew Margolin, and Wang Liao, who have created a unique way to watch the emotional dynamics of the game in real-time during this year’s Super Bowl.

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Have national smoking bans worked in reducing harms in passive smoking?

The most robust evidence yet, published today in the Cochrane Library, suggests that national smoking legislation does reduce the harms of passive smoking, and particularly risks from heart disease. The updated Cochrane review containing more up-to-date research found that countries who imposed smoking bans found their populations benefited from reduced exposure to passive smoke, specifically cardiovascular disease.

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